Vertical cotton®, beyond being the world’s organic cotton reference for its quality, transparent traceability and ethics, is an organization that makes people prosperous and happy.

Why is it called Vertical Cotton® ?

 

  • The cotton crops grow one on top of the other. 
  • The production chain is vertical to ensure the kindest and most caring form of trade that ever has been.

Vertical Cotton’s reason to be

Save 90% of water

The solution >

Cotton traceability

With the cotton blockchain >

Fair and ethical for all

Is it not already ? >

Prosperity for cotton farmers

How ? >

100% of organic cotton on Earth

Today it’s only 5% >

A free solution for independent farmers

Who is paying ? >

At the source of the vertical cotton there are men and women who have locally manufactured clay pots.

There are hands that have sown one by one the organic cotton seeds in a rich soil, made fertile by an agriculture that feeds nature first.

There are the precise gestures to harvest and comb the cotton.

On this path is the one who, fallen in love with vertical cotton, sublimates it and gives it its ultimate shape.

 

Vertical Cotton profits to all. It benefits the 120 million families for whom cotton is the main source of income, as well as the billions of consumers who choose to join its virtuous circle.

VERTICAL COTTON®

$ for customer * 1

Boosts nature

Long fiber, long life

Creates Prosperity.

uses 1/10 of water

exploites 35% of the area for cotton 

15% for food crops

50% for nature

Our solution >

December 2020 : 10km²

99% of Vertical Cotton in 2027

STANDARD COTTON

$ for customer * 1

Destroys nature

Short fiber, short life

Keeps people poor 

Overuse of water

exploites 100% of the area for cotton

July 2020 : approx. 295 000 km² = 2,5% planet

No more OGM cotton in 2027

ORGANIC COTTON

$ for customer * 3

Preserves nature

Long fiber, long life

Reduces poverty

uses 1/3 of water

exploites 100% of the area for cotton

July 2020 : 4730 km²

1% of Organic cotton in 2027

STANDARD COTTON

$ for customer * 1

Destroys nature

Short fiber, short life

Keeps people poor 

Overuse of water

exploites 100% of the area for cotton

 

 

 

July 2020 : approx. 295 000 km² = 2,5% planet

No more OGM cotton in 2027

VERTICAL COTTON®

$ for customer * 1

Boosts nature

Long fiber, long life

Creates Prosperity.

uses 1/10 of water

exploites 35% of the area for cotton 

15% for food crops

50% for nature

Our solution >

December 2020 : 10km²

99% of Vertical Cotton in 2027

ORGANIC COTTON

$ for customer * 3

Preserves nature

Long fiber, long life

Reduces poverty

uses 1/3 of water

exploites 100% of the area for cotton

 

 

 

July 2020 : 4730 km²

1% of Organic cotton in 2027

nature is our most valued customer

Let's make the world a better place !
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  • Organic Cotton Project Guide, Frank Eyhorn, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture

  • Material Snapshot, Organic cotton, Textile Exchange, 2016

  • Crop rotation, Physiology today, Kater Hake, Don Blasingame, Charles Burmester, Peter B. Goodell and Charles Stichler, 1991

  • Premierevision.com

  • Mexico Cotton : Harvest begins, Estimated Production Increases from Last Year, United States Department of Agriculture, Oct 2017

  • Failed promises the rise and fall of GM cotton in India, Soil Organization, October 2017

  • Cotton and climate change impacts and options to mitigate and adapt, International trade centre

  • Measuring sustainability in cotton farming systems – ICAC/SEEP Report, 2015

  • Life Cycle Assessment of Organic Cotton Fiber, Textile Exchange, 2014

  • The Influence of Forest Management on Landscape Structure in the Cool-Temperate Forest Region of Central Japan. Miyamoto, Asako, and Makoto Sano, Landscape and Urban Planning 86 (2008): 248,248-256.

  • Tree Regeneration in Partially Cut Conifer-Hardwood Mixed Forests in Northern Japan : Roles of Establishment Substrate and Dwarf Bamboo. Noguchi, Mahoko, and Toshiya Yoshida, Forest Ecology and Management 190 (2004): 335,335-344.

  • Documents of the Dust Bowl, R. Douglas Hurt

  • Sandstrom, T; Forsberg, B (2008). “Desert dust : An unrecognized source of dangerous air pollution?”. Epidemiology. 19 (6): 808–9. 

  • Electric Sand Findings, University of Michigan Jan. 6, 2008. Eurekalert.org. 2008-01-07. Archived from the original on 2016-05-20.